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MP 2021 TX14 for Southern Hemisphere
#1
The MP 2021 TX14 is predicted to reach ~16.6 magnitude on 2021 Oct 19 @0600 UT in Fornax. It may be observable in the southern hemisphere. The attached file contains the osculating elements from JPL's HORIZONS website from Oct 16 to Oct 26 at 6 hour intervals. Closest approach according to the CNEOS website is Oct 19 @1507 at Re 0.00343 AU. The elements appear to be based on a 9 day observation arc, so should be good. Here's the link to the JPL page for this MP:

Small-Body Database Lookup (nasa.gov)

Happy hunting,

Phil S.
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#2
Looks like us northerners will suffer daylight!
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#3
Hi BMD,

Unfortunately not uncommon. I attached my DBPS for Oct 19 as a .stx file. I included 2019 XS despite it being >0.05 AU distant because it looks like a good one. (3361) Orpheus & (4660) Nereus look like two more good ones. At least they're big & hopefully bright.

I saw your PM. It looks like the elements from all 3 sources are in good agreement. If the weather cooperates, you should have a good chance of spotting 2019 XS.

Phil S.
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#4
Thanks for the list Phil. Even Vertigo doesn't have the light grasp to drag any of those out of even Bortle 1 skies. Gee, if only I were an imager. You sure do hunt down the list of faint ones :=)
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#5
Thanks Phil.

Sadly, the forecast for Brisbane is a week of rain...today the swimming pool in our back garden went up 6 cms (over 2 inches) with just today's rain. Rolleyes

So, it looks like I will miss out. Sad 


Cheers

Dennis
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#6
Sorry to hear that you're rained out, Dennis. You were our best hope  Wink. Don't you get a dry season at some point? Spring rains, I suppose. The equivalent of our 'April showers, bring May flowers'.

Phil S.
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#7
(2021-10-18, 04:33 PM)PMSchu Wrote: Sorry to hear that you're rained out, Dennis. You were our best hope  Wink. Don't you get a dry season at some point? Spring rains, I suppose. The equivalent of our 'April showers, bring May flowers'.

Phil S.

Hi Phil

SE Queensland is sub-tropical in terms of climate and generally, we have hot, humid, wet summers and dry, cool, windy winters. So, we get periods of very steady seeing in summer (if there are no clouds) and very transparent skies in winter, but with generally poorer seeing conditions.

Cheers

Dennis
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#8
It looks like I forgot to include the log entries when I saved the .stx file, so my notes on Max brightness & Re information wasn't included. I've wiped the MP DB & that log info is gone. I'm working on the NEAs for 2021 Oct 20 now, so I'll post the .stx file for today in a new thread.

Phil S.
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#9
I was just running a bunch of these and looked up to realize the Moon is being naughty again!
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