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Tips for matching wide field orientation
#1
Hi all

I'm struggling with trying to (visually) match a wide field image to the orientation provided in the Camera View of ST. The two most natural orientations are either landscape or portrait, but as far as I can see it isn't possible to keep the CV "locked" in either of those because there are no manual orientation settings available (only Flip or Mirror).

So how do people do it, without standing on your head?

Thanks
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#2
Hello,

I'm not sure that I follow exactly... but the Camera View should match the orientation of your actual images, taking into account the PA set for your Imaging System. If the PA for the camera is set to "fixed' then you can freely rotate the view on the atlas by clicking on and holding the little circle at one corner of the FOV. At least that's how its supposed to work. Feel free to elaborate more if this wasn't helpful.
Clear skies,
Greg

Technoking of Skyhound
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#3
I was referring to existing wide field images that I have taken (pre ST). So I have an image on screen in an image viewer. The image is presented in landscape orientation (as would normally be the case). Then I try to use ST to match the orientation of the image.

The problem in this case is that while the camera FOV rectangle can be oriented at any angle, the image in the image viewer remains in landscape mode. So you are trying to visually match something in landscape to something that could be at any angle. This can sometimes be quite difficult and time consuming to achieve.

Better would be if it was possible to keep the FOV rectangle in a fixed orientation (ie landscape) and rotate the star field around the centroid of the rectangle. I guess it is possible, but perhaps not viable to do.

Cheers
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#4
Hello,

What most people do is to plate solve the image and plot it in the background of the charts (I thought you were maybe asking about that). That way the image conforms to the chart and things can be labeled and identified.
Clear skies,
Greg

Technoking of Skyhound
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