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Jupiter, Europa, Io & Ganymede
#1
Here is an image of Jupiter with Galilean moons Europa (with shadow), Io and Ganymede taken on 10th Feb 2018.
 
Generally, the seeing was quite good with some light cloud around.
 
Taken with a Takahashi Mewlon 210 F11.5, TeleVue Powermate x2.0 (efl 4800mm), ZWO ASI 120MM-S and Starlight Xpress USB FW.
 
The image is made up of 30 sec R, G and B AVIs and is my first time using RGB filters in planetary imaging.
 
Cheers
 
Dennis


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#2
Nice!
Clear skies,
Greg

SkyTools Developer
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#3
Indeed, it is a nice image.

However, in trying to determine the time it was taken, I found the only recent match for the pictured satellite and shadow positions was on 16-Feb-2018 (not the 10th) at about 19:45 UT. Given that Jupiter is currently a morning object, that time would suggest it was taken at the longitude of Japan / Australia. Since it's oriented South up and East to the right, if it's a correct view (e.g., like binoculars), then it was probably taken Down Under.
Joe Stieber
http://sjastro.org/
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#4
Wow, Dennis!

This makes me want to wake up early and put Jupiter in a scope.  I would too, if only someone would remove these clouds!

Great image, truly!

John..
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#5
(2018-02-22, 08:40 PM)Joe Stieber Wrote: Indeed, it is a nice image.

However, in trying to determine the time it was taken, I found the only recent match for the pictured satellite and shadow positions was on 16-Feb-2018 (not the 10th) at about 19:45 UT. Given that Jupiter is currently a morning object, that time would suggest it was taken at the longitude of Japan / Australia. Since it's oriented South up and East to the right, if it's a correct view (e.g., like binoculars), then it was probably taken Down Under.

Hi Joe

Good detective work. Here is an earlier (cropped) shot with some details.

Cheers

Dennis


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